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Tyler

 

Over 4 million Syrian refugees have left their war-torn country. Many have immigrated to neighboring countries like Jordan, Turkey, Egypt, Iraq, and Lebanon. Still, more seek asylum in other parts of Europe, including Germany, Sweden, France, and Italy. Domestic tensions are increasing over the welcoming, open-door policies of Germany and Sweden as cultures clash. 40% of Germans believe Merkel should resign, and the public is shifting toward a more conservative political ideology. Some Europeans are up in arms about crimes allegedly committed by men of Middle Eastern descent. A recent string of New Years Eve incidents involving groping and sexual harassment and at least one reported rape is the last straw for some Germans. Sweden, one of the most popular countries accepting refugees, is planning to expel and deport 80,000 asylum seekers through 2016. While this is primarily a European issue it may very well become the responsibility of the US as well. Hilary Clinton has said she is prepared to accept 65,000 refugees, screened and vetted, into the US. Is it America’s responsibility? Can you truly screen these refugees? Should European countries continue to accept refugees despite the issues that come along with them? If not, are they to go back home and face violent warfare and dangerous living conditions?

 

There are only tough answers to these questions. With the very liberal viewpoints that have become commonplace in first world countries, the pressure to house all these people is almost as intense as the opposition.

Syrian Refugees

Syrian Refugees